DSC02047.JPG

Myths and Mortals

“Hands down, this is one of the best new albums of 2017.” 
— ~ Steve Morse, 30 year Boston Globe critic; current Rock History professor at Berklee College of Music

BAND

Vocals, Guitar, Mandolin / Jen Reilly
Vocals, Guitar / Eddy Bluma
Bass / John Abbey
Percussion / Gerald Dowd

Offical Bio

 

Our emerging modern selves are so often understood as fluid…the arranging and rearranging of the self to become anything that society needs of it to be next.  The continual awareness of our own reflection, domination, and hustle, prompts the loss of human sense, and a superior attitude of “presentism,” says T.S. Eliot.  The New Zeitgeist, the links of Chicago’s Jen Reilly and Eddy Bluma, beckon a revolution as well as a recovering of the simple things in life that matter.

Little cowboy what have you heard up on the lonely mound?

Only the yellow bird/Only the Eastern ground

Sighs in sultry fields/Can you hear the sound

Of a time stood still/Of a time stood still

Exploring the origins of the oral folk tradition that touches outlaw and rock ballads, the Geist draws heavily from suspenseful and captivating stories of fairies, earth, and work that call into our current socio-political times.  Far-reaching, yet familiar; The New Zeitgeist calls from the deep to weary, worn trails of spirits lingering. 

The Ghost Trail is filled with carriages

Broken Hopes and Lost promises

Forgotten and blown into bits

Beneath cobblestone and brick

For The New Zeitgeist, time is highly connected to creating music.  Inviting and captivating, this connection can be physically heard on their latest album, Myths and Mortals.  T.S. Eliot states, “No poet has meaning alone. His appreciation and significance is the direct relation to the dead poets and artists.”  Likewise, The New Zeitgeist shares: “Our sense of what it is to be presently human not only involves our mortal stories but also our roots from beyond.”  The channel is roots, and Myths and Mortals, the duo’s critical new Mike Hagler produced album, blossoms like a shady willow in the scornful heat of summer.

Jen Reilly and Eddy Bluma met as solo artists entering the music scene of Chicago in 2009, but might as well have been around since 1929.  “Old souls,” migrating from desert and sea, the two began collaborating as a folk duo with tempting harmonies and lonesome spirituals.  Reilly’s country gospel roots and southern swing deeply welcomed the black leather grit of Bluma’s rock influences in new intertwining medley.  Providing folk-nymph echoes to Bluma’s timeless music, Reilly quickly found heightened vocal expression and newfound writing territory. “It’s been awhile since I’ve described a vocalist as having ‘a great set of pipes,’ but that fits those of Jen Reilly,” WXRT’s Richard Milne commented of the duo’s self-titled 2014 debut release.    

Engineered and co-produced by Michael Hagler at King Size Sound Labs, whose repertoire includes staple projects like Wilco/Billy Bragg’s Mermaid Avenue and Jon Langford’s Waco Brothers, and whom The New Zeitgeist’s partnership over the last several years, “Myths and Mortals,” has risen to develop a sound that is world-worn but powerful and commanding of attention.  The album expands the duo’s standalone intimate harmonic swells, featuring Chicago hometown heroes Gerald Dowd, John Abbey, as well as Alton Smith.  Most outstanding for this rising duo, is the contribution of Austin City Limits Hall Of Fame member Lloyd Maines, whose collaborations range from Guy Clark to Joe Ely.

The performance experience is a tangible array, fearlessly enchanting the listener (CAU, On Axis Music). The sound of the band fills any room--from small venues to large festivals.  The New Zeitgeist’s performance is a true embodiment of authentic art--it is true to self, informed by the past, and it is an actualizing channel of freedom, honesty, and identification.  Myths and Mortals, with its reflection upon past and present, is wholly in the now (CAU, On Axis Music).

 

News

Sept. 18, 2017

WGN-Live from Studio 435!

The Download with Justin Kaufmann

Click on the link above to hear our live interview with WGN host Justin Kaufmann.  We talk about the genre of roots, contemplate the meaning and power of folk, how stories shaped the record, & working with the great Lloyd Maines on our latest record, "Myths and Mortals." Watch our liveStudio 435 performances of "Looking Glass Man," "The Ghost Trail," and "Desert Rose."

July 18, 2017

Country Standard Time

The New Zeitgeist, Myths and Mortals (Self-released)(Click here for Link)

Reviewed by Lee Zimmerman

Jen Reilly and Eddy Bluma, the Chicago based duo that dubs themselves The New Zeitgeist, met as solo artists in 2009. Eight years later, they have created a particular branding that relies on heady perception, a knowing perspective and a haunting goth/folk/country sound. In a sense, "Myths and Mortals" portends to be something significant, whether it's through the pair's obvious reverence for traditional roots or a general sort of circumspect that suggests they're aiming for a philosophically higher ground. In fact, it's a level of awareness that only book literate, fully cognisant listeners might find cause to fully appreciate.

Like the Handsome Family and forlorn folksters of an earlier era, Reilly and Bluma harbor the spirits that dwell in the hidden hollows of Appalachia and the dust blown stretches of far western prairies. There's a mournful sadness that seeps through these songs like the wind through a creaky screen door, all barren emotion and weary resignation. Reilly wails and moans in ways that elevate these plaintive melodies to a higher purpose, giving songs such as "The Ghost Trail" and "Old Hammerin' Bill" a vivid tone and trapping that's as darkly descriptive as the names imply. Reilly and Bluma are old souls in every sense - stoic, solid and sincere,bound to a tireless tradition that serves both the imagery and their intentions very well.

Ultimately, "Myths and Mortals" may prove to be too deliberative and pensive for some, too dire and despondent for others. None of that should be surprising, given the fact that the pair have carved out a vintage-sounding niche. Still, those that admire a certain seminal style may will be entranced, drawn to the cerebral suggestion that this rugged gem of a record has to offer.

July 17, 2017

The Morton Report

Reviewed by Jeff Burger

The New Zeitgeist-Myths and Mortals (Click here for link)

Good luck guessing which three of the 11 tracks here date from the 1800s; they sound no more or less timeless than the originals on this album, which features vocals and poetic lyrics by a Chicago-based duo: Jen Reilly, who sounds redolent of Judy Collins, and Eddy Bluma. If you like the work of such artists as Fairport Convention, Renaissance,and Richard and Linda Thompson, give this well-honed collection a listen.

July 6 2017

Associated Press review  (Click here for ARTICLE) 

Review: The New Zeitgeist’s music connects Dublin and Austin

By Steven Wine | AP July 6

The New Zeitgeist, “Myths and Mortals” (The New Zeitgeist)

Many of the lyrics on “Myths and Mortals” date back more than a century, which is why the New Zeitgeist is singing of fairies, fables and linnet’s wings. This is real roots music that connects Dublin and Austin.

The Chicago-based duo Jen Reilly and Eddy Bluma pair original material with poems by W.B. Yeats, Carl Sandburg, William Allingham and Sidney Lanier, and they make the words sing. It helps that Reilly could win a Kathy Mattea impersonation contest — her sturdy alto matches the material, whether the setting is dappled grass or a dusty trail. Bluma’s guitar and a supporting cast that includes Lloyd Maines on Dobro and pedal steel deftly straddle musical genres.

There’s a crunchy hint of the blues on “Looking Glass Man,” while “Peter Pan’s Remorse” conjures druids. “Desert Rose” gives a country waltz an Irish lilt, and “Kingdom Highway” is Gaelic gospel. It all makes for an enchanting mix like nothing else being heard in roadhouses or pubs.

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

July 7 2017

WLUW Razor & Die Interview

We had a gas at the WLUW studio discussing blue hair, ghost trails, and why fairies are on the new album. Click on the player to listen to the full interview! 

 

July 5 2017

CAU On Axis Music Review

The New Zeitgeist Myths and Mortals

by Hannah Frank On Axis Music

Cinematic, fresh and lush-- this is country music without the dirt and dust, simply the soaring voices and storytelling, wrapped in layered arrangements with symphonic depth and vocal beauty which is normally reserved for classical music. Delivering mood as the main ingredient, these songs create visuals with bits of stories and characters which read like movie scores to a movie we can't quite see, just imagine.

Using imagery which recalls America's Wild West, the mysteries of personal journeys, as well as hints of Elizabethan ballads, the album is built on the foundations of the past. Yet, like a novel it creates its own reality without compromise.  

The album Myths and Mortals is full of galloping rhythms, instrumentation of guitar, lap steel, flute, drums, organ, and more. The vocals of Jen Reilly burn fire-like throughout, creating embers which catch the imagination. They stand out most on Desert Rose, a country ballad where fans of Patsy Cline are defied to not melt. Looking Glass Man is reminiscent of Grace Slick with Jefferson Airplane with the grunge replaced by ethereal waves, thanks to vocals and perfect cymbal crashing, creating a bath of sonic beauty. Kingdom Highway is the song that hints at America's gospel tradition, with Kingdom Highway being a metaphor for Kingdom Come; where the narrator hears a joyful noise, drawing them in, and hears the angels singing a joyful tune. Organ fills in and the song establishes a groove with a comfortable hook on guitar that sets off the vocals. Several tracks feature Eddy Bluma on vocals, which balances the album as he shares a steadfast world-worn wisdom which foils the ethereal.

This is not folk music in an "Oh Brother Where Art Thou" aesthetic, or a retro rockabilly country style full of kitsch and vintage thrift store costumes, rather, its artifice is holistic-- it seeks to envelop you completely, rather than simply be a novelty. To achieve this, there is not a hair out of place. With formalities in delivery and execution, it allows us to take refuge in the mysteries of the past, while creating a present in which reality is defined by what surrounds us. Like finding an old trunk in an attic and being pulled into another world, the album uses the artifacts of the past to awaken our curiosity and help us unearth new emotions in the present.

A convergence of influences work hand in hand. Scales and modes recall the Eastern influence on the Western United States through Chinese immigrants, as well as Native American influence on the American West, mixed with the stories of pioneers and explorers who dealt in a land of strange beauty and savage mysteries.

Storytelling by Bluma on tracks like The Ghost Trail include lines “red dusty streets...miner's regrets and gambler's debts...”, recalling the red clay of the South, as well as imagery of cliffs and cobblestone.  The chorus about a ghost trail not only refers to Westward expansion, but also to our personal pilgrimages. On Fear of Little Men, the vocals of Reilly and Bluma work together expertly, with a mysterious hook that keeps the song engaging, while the upbeat Lack of Linear Thought is a present-day pop song, with a fun organ riff that is undeniably smile inducing.

The American West mirrors personal paths, with the unforeseen challenges and victories as well as inevitable defeats at the hands of fate-- yet even within this there is beauty. Instead of a textbook about the past, or a caricature of it, I sense the timelessness of it. This is the great achievement of this album. For a time when we all might want to take a break from smartphones and current events, this album offers not only a portal to another world (which is relaxing, epic and full of waderlust) but the reminder that we create our own realities.

June 21 2017

The Alternate Root Review

The New Zeitgeist (from the album Myths and Mortals)

Middle America visits the citizens of middle earth as Chicago, Illinois duo The New Zeitgeist explore the origin of Folk traditions and oral stories involving meetings of Myths and Mortals on their recent release. The New Zeitgeist link the past with the present, spinning tales in tune with olden times (“Lake Isle of Innisfree”, “Peter Pan’s Remorse”) with an nod to the Myths and Mortals that inhabit the new lands of America (“Song of the Chattahoochee”, “Old Hammerin’ Bill”). The folk-based feel of the album incorporates elements of western Country as twang moves slowly on the dry air breeze of “Desert Rose” and mountain rhythms push the pace along the dark edge of “The Ghost Trail”. The New Zeitgeist came together when solo performers Jen Reilly and Eddy Bluma met on the Chicago Folk music scene. Performing as a duo since 2009, the pair blended Southern feel of Jen Reilly’s background with the grit in the music of Eddy Bluma. 

Myths and Mortals wanders “Kingdom Highway” with majestic vocals, lightly steps on sparkling notes for “Fear of Little Men (March of the Faeries)”, and puts downfalls heavy footfalls of rhythm for “Looking Glass Man” as The New Zeitgeist back the fantasy tale in “The Wandering Aengus” with soft country guitar riffs.

June 15 2017

1st album Review! Steve Morse            

My Independent Review of THE NEW ZEITGEIST

MYTHS AND MORTALS

   "Songs evoking a sense of mystery are often missing from today's music scene, but they are the lifeblood of this hauntingly brilliant Chicago act. Anchored by singers Jen Reilly and Eddy Bluma, the group delves into everything from mystical folk tales to adapting timeless poems by Carl Sandburg and William Butler Yeats. The enchanting, electro-acoustic soundscapes move from Celtic folk-rock to soulful country in the vein of Emmylou Harris and Gram Parsons (the song "Desert Rose" evokes Parsons' legendary "Hickory Wind"), to the more determined rock of Bluma's "The Ghost Trail." Reilly has a supple, emotionally riveting voice that suggests the legendary Sandy Denny of Fairport Convention. She mesmerizes throughout, whether on her self-written "Kingdom Highway" or the public domain "Song of the Wandering Aengus," where her vocal takes a flight into the heavens and leaves you completely in awe.

Hands down, this is one of the best new albums of 2017."

   -- STEVE MORSE, longtime Boston Globe critic; current professor in Rock History at Berklee College of Music

June 2 2017

"Myths And

Mortals"

Available Now!

You can purchase the album in either form of a digital download folder or CD directly from the band at our website store www.thenewzeitgeist.com/store!  We also have digital distribution across most online music platforms including iTunes/Apple Music, Spotify, Google Play, and Amazon (physical warehouse & digital) if you prefer a certain online store, made possible by our distributor CD Baby where you can find special deals on buying the album in bulk (makes a great gift J).  Additionally, our YouTube channel has experienced a complete new summer “do” and is ready for watching!

Apple Music by iTunes: https://geo.itunes.apple.com/us/album/myths-and-mortals/id1233763219?mt=1&app=music

Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/album/5KBGKPX3OvYY3wrEoKXair

Google Play: https://play.google.com/store/music/album/Jen_Reilly_Eddy_Bluma_The_New_Zeitgeist?id=Brz6g4r2aws2x4h4wgfubgfts2u

Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B071NPPTQ7/ref=dm_ws_sp_ps_dp

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCz3mk_iWxuJs3BP-oZRSo5A

CD Baby: https://store.cdbaby.com/cd/thenewzeitgeist2

May 2017

 

January 2017

"Myths and Mortals" Spring Release


Greetings, Friends, City-folk, and Country Dwellers~

 

Happy New Year to you this January of 2017, and a rousing "Cheers," Salud, skål, Gānbēi, Εβίβα, or Na zdraví from Chicago roots duo The New Zeitgeist! How did you imagine your life in the year or 2017?  What did you think you would be doing? What did you believe would be the social movements, or the roles of art at this time? Last New Year, I made a resolution to read a new poem each week. I'd like to share one from the renowned author T.S. Elliot that has inspired our story. He writes in 1919: 

“No poet has meaning alone. His appreciation and significance is the direct relation to the dead poets and artists. If any artist should write, he should do so with all of the generations of literature in his bones!” 

Our band name evolved from considering time...the times, critical points in time, and new eras.  We not only hope to revive ageless stories that are especially meaningful today, but cultivate a spirit of connection.  In a growing time of divide, disparity, and doubt, our music, sound, and stories are evolving and our latest recording effort has nearly come to completion!

Friends, we are proud to make the announcement of our 2nd upcoming album, Myths and Mortals, to be released early Spring 2017! It highlights poetry and folktales from nature and beyond while digging even deeper into the edgier roots of rock, folk, and blues. It features hometown heroes Gerald Dowd on drums and John Abbey on bass.  Also featured on steel will be Austin City Limits Hall Of Fame member Lloyd Maines! 

We are moved to have met you somehow along the way—because we believe art comes from a true encounter with another that leaves you changed.  We are ecstatic and humbled to invite you to support our band by connecting with our band page on Facebook, as well as our new website where you can keep updated on our events, upcoming shows, and single release. Look for our new single, "Song of the Chattahoochee" end of January that will be available on our new website!

Our hope is to not only join some small part of renowned literary winds to which we owe everything, but join a new spirit of artists in creating the times ahead. We hope you and yours are renewed, inspired, and whole this coming year of 2017!!! Thanks for your amazing life as artists.  

“Our story is never written in isolation. We do not act in a one-man play. We can do nothing that does not affect other people, no matter how loudly we say, "It's my own business.”  Madeleine L'Engle

~Jen Reilly and Eddy Bluma, Chicago, IL